Blogs

The Brainiac Blog

If you’d like to submit a blog, please read the submission guidelines and then submit your writing directly on the webform page. If you’re interested in being an editor or have any questions, please email thebrainiac.blog@ubc.ca

GPN student Ariana Cahn writes about how inacessible science can be, and how this can be discouraging for researchers and the general public alike. 

Read more

This blog highlights the ins and outs of Databinge, a unique program that allows the UBC neuroscience community to come together and discuss data analysis problems.

Read more

The Brainiac speaks with the A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research (AMiNDR) podcast team! 

Read more

Recent grads and graduate students share their tips and tricks on how they thrived throughout their time in the Graduate Program in Neuroscience. 

Read more

PhD student Amanda Cheung talks to Co-Editors-In Chief of Neuropsyched, an online science communication platform based out of UBC. 

Read more

It is no secret that scientists can struggle with communication. Breaking down complex research into a digestible format is tough, and miscommunication between scientists and journalists can lead to confusion and inflation of scientific findings. In the times of COVID, it is more important than ever that scientists can explain their work effectively so that the general public can be accurately informed and not misled.

Read more

Building professional relationships is vital to the career success of scientists, especially trainees and early-career researchers. With academic conferences going virtual, many of us are exploring new ways to share our research and to connect with the broader academic community. Here, I share my experience for anyone preparing to attend their first virtual conference.

Read more

In this mini-series, we will be checking in with GPN Alumni who have gone on to have successful careers outside of academia. Our first profile is Dr. Andrea Globa, who graduated from the Bamji lab in 2017.  

Read more

​You may have heard that smoking marijuana causes schizophrenia. While this is not entirely accurate, there are some examples of otherwise healthy people experiencing psychotic symptoms after consuming marijuana. When this happens, it’s never solely due to consuming cannabis. It’s actually  a result of complicated factors interacting with one another, such as a person’s biology, genetics, and the environment in which they live.

Read more

You don’t need a degree in neuroscience to suspect that the brain and gut are somehow connected. But what may not be obvious is just how connected the brain and gut are. Emerging evidence is showing that the gut–brain axis is one of the most powerful relationships in our body.

Read more

Pages